Overview
James Stief
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James E. Stief

Member; Chair, Business Law Department
Cleveland

EMAIL jstief@mcdonaldhopkins.com

PHONE 216.430.2031

WATCH: Meet James Stief

Experience

Jim is Chair of the firm's Business Law Department and serves on the firm's Executive Committee and Board of Directors. He concentrates his practice in the areas of commercial finance, business planning and strategic analysis, raising capital, mergers and acquisitions, joint ventures and general contract negotiation.

He serves as legal counsel and a business advisor to a wide variety of commercial lending institutions, specialty lenders, subordinated debt lenders and large and middle-market companies.

Jim is a Certified Public Accountant (inactive). He worked for Arthur Andersen prior to attending law school.

Jim earned his J.D., cum laude, from University of Notre Dame Law School. He received a B.S., cum laude, from John Carroll University.  

Representative Cases/Matters

  • A global bank in connection with a syndicated $220 million multi-currency asset-based revolving credit facility extended to a publicly-traded diversified manufacturer with operations throughout the world.  The credit facility included various secured credit lines issued to borrowers in the United States and several foreign countries, as well as the integration of existing complex senior subordinated notes.
  • A global bank in connection with a syndicated $125 million multi-currency asset-based credit facility (revolving and term loans) extended to a publicly-traded global supplier of metal alloys, which included the negotiation of complex subordination issues in connection with the issuance of a $35 million subordinated note.
  • A global bank in connection with a syndicated $50 million asset-based revolving credit facility extended to a national chain of religious product retail stores, which included the negotiation of sensitive inter-creditor issues in connection with the issuance of a $35 million second lien note.
  • A national bank in connection with a syndicated $55 million asset-based revolving credit facility extended to a publicly-traded manufacturer of turf care products.  The transaction included highly complex negotiations with the company’s subordinated lenders, main supplier and credit card provider.
  • A global bank in connection with a $15 million credit facility used to facilitate the acquisition of a national stamping company.
  • A global bank in connection with a syndicated $28 million asset-based revolving credit facility extended to a national chain of discount retail stores. 
  • A global bank in connection with a $20 million revolving credit facility to a chemical and fertilizer company with operations throughout the United States and Canada, which included a secured Canadian-based revolving facility.
  • A national bank in connection with a $14.5 million credit facility (revolving, term and capex loans) to a precision-formed metal products and assemblies company in connection with a dividend recapitalization. 
  • A global bank in connection with a $13.5 million asset-based credit facility (revolving and term loans) extended to a global provider of tools and tooling.  The revolving facility included an export-import facility to support the borrower’s international receivables.
  • A global bank in connection with a syndicated $70 million asset-based revolving credit facility extended to an international supplier of aluminum, which included a complex import structure related to the purchase of raw materials. 
  • A global bank in connection with a $10 million revolving credit facility to a steel company that had recently been purchased out of bankruptcy by a nationally recognized leveraged buyout fund.
  • A national bank with a $19 million credit facility, which included a revolving loan and two separate real estate term loans, extended to a national storage company.
  • A global bank in connection with a $9.75 million of acquisition financing (revolving and term loans) to a metal stamping and assembly company purchased by a nationally recognized private equity fund, which included a complex parent guaranty. 
  • A global bank in connection with a $5.47 million asset-based credit facility (revolving and term loans) to a family-owned national distributor of specialty tools, fluids and abrasives.
  • A global bank in connection with $13.45 million of acquisition financing (revolving and term loans) to a metal processing and engineer components company purchased by a nationally recognized private equity fund, which included a complex secured overadvance sub-facility.
  • A merchant bank in connection with the purchase of a $3 million subordinated note and warrants from a company engaged in the design and manufacturing of plastic containers and liner products.  The company used the proceeds of the sale, along with the proceeds of a new senior facility, to fund its newly created Employee Stock Ownership Plan.
  • A merchant bank in connection with the purchase of a $6 million subordinated note and warrants from a market leader in the design and sale of specialty fabrics.  The company used the proceeds of the sale, along with the proceeds of a new senior facility, to fund a management buyout and its newly created Employee Stock Ownership Plan.
  • Multiple global, national and local banks, lending corporations and mezzanine funds in connection with purchasing syndicated interests in loans ranging for $10 million to $1.1 billion.
  • A troubled specialty chemicals manufacturer owned equally two private equity funds in connection with a new $25 million senior credit facility from a global bank and a $11 million second lien loan from a hedge fund.   
  • One of the largest privately-owned tooling companies in North America with a $22.5 million credit facility (revolving, term and capex loans) from a national bank, which included the negotiation of several complex subordination and guaranty agreements. 
  • An international metals distributor with a $15 million revolving credit facility, which included the negotiation of very sensitive inter-creditor issues.
  • A large scrap metal company with a $24.6 million asset-based credit facility (revolving, term and capex loans) to consummate a large asset purchase and a dividend recapitalization.
  • A national producer and supplier of bottled water with a $13.3 million credit facility (revolving, term and capex loans) in connection with a forced recapitalization by the existing senior lender.
  • A manufacturer and distributor of automotive switches and sensors with a $9 million credit facility (line of credit and term loans) used primarily to fund a dividend recapitalization.
  • A leveraged real estate pledge fund in connection with a $10 million revolving bridge line of credit from its investors.
Credentials

Admissions - Court

  • Ohio Supreme Court

Admissions - State

  • Ohio

Education

  • University of Notre Dame Law School
  • John Carroll University

Honors and Awards

  • Selected for inclusion in Ohio Super Lawyers (2011-2018)
  • Named one of the Best Lawyers in America (2013-2018)
  • Named leader in Ohio Banking & Finance - Chambers USA (2012-2017)

Professional Membership

  • Commercial Finance Association
  • Turnaround Management Association
  • ESOP Association

Public Service and Volunteerism

  • American Heart Association (Board of Directors)
  • Deepwood Industries (Board of Trustees)
Events

Events

Speaking Engagements

  • The Perishable Agricultural Commodities Act (PACA), KeyBank, January 2016
  • Panelist, "The Financing Fix," TMA Chicago/Midwest Chapter Women's Group Luncheon, April 9, 2014
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